The Ways of Water

Suzette Bousema, Jana Romanova, Koos Buster, Mazen Al Ashkar, Frank Bloem, Tina Farifteh, The Water School, Elise ’t Hart

Free

Exhibition about the relationship between humankind and water

Humans have an effect on water, and water has an effect on humans. Different artists make wide-ranging work about the many faces of water and the relationship between water and humans in this age. The exhibition is freely accessible


What effect does humankind have on the sea, on rivers, lakes, ground and rain water? And what effects does water have on humans? Water can form a threat, but it can also be a source of inspiration. In the imagination of artists and writers: water can be destructive, but also: purifying, the source of life, healing and protective.


This group exhibition explores, through photography and art installations, the relationship between humans and water: humans’ dependence on, as well as subordination to water. This source of life is, paradoxically, both destructive, as well as necessary and healing. A number of (inter)national multimedia artists will explore the influence of man-made climate change, pollution and depletion on our planet’s water. Human adaptability to these changes is essential.

This programme is part of the overarching programme Manifesto for the living in a time of extinction.

dates

3 June - 10 July, wednesday to sunday, 12 to 9 pm

Prices

  • free entry € 0

language & duration

  • Language no problem

Context program

On the occasion of this group exhibition, a diverse and in-depth context program has been put together by the Melkweg. In this program, various speakers will elaborate on the meaning of water in both their personal lives and their artistic and/or professional practice. The paradoxical power of water - as a source of life and as a source of destruction - will be explored through several in-depth lectures and a closing spoken word performance. All this while enjoying 'water' cocktails and seaweed summer snacks by vegan chef Hanneke van Tol (Hannibal Kitchen).
More information

Background

‘Focus on adaptation’ is the conclusion of the independent institute for applied research in the field of water, Deltares, in response to the most recent IPCC report (United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). 

The urgent call of the report is not limited to the need to reduce carbon emissions; it also focuses on accelerating adaptation to the consequences of climate change. Not all effects of climate change can be prevented and so sound preparation is enormously important. In this exhibition, artists reflect on the relationship between water and humans in our time, and the need for adaptation.

Context program

On the occasion of this group exhibition, a diverse and in-depth context program has been put together by the Melkweg. In this program, various speakers will elaborate on the meaning of water in both their personal lives and their artistic and/or professional practice. The paradoxical power of water - as a source of life and as a source of destruction - will be explored through several in-depth lectures and a closing spoken word performance. All this while enjoying 'water' cocktails and seaweed summer snacks by vegan chef Hanneke van Tol (Hannibal Kitchen).
More information

Background

‘Focus on adaptation’ is the conclusion of the independent institute for applied research in the field of water, Deltares, in response to the most recent IPCC report (United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). 

The urgent call of the report is not limited to the need to reduce carbon emissions; it also focuses on accelerating adaptation to the consequences of climate change. Not all effects of climate change can be prevented and so sound preparation is enormously important. In this exhibition, artists reflect on the relationship between water and humans in our time, and the need for adaptation.

The participating artists

Suzette Bousema concentrates in a poetic series, called Future Relics, on the plastic soup and in the series Climate Archive she photographed ice cores — tubular samples of ice — that are used as a tool for observing climate change. 

Through her Water Portraits Jana Romanova shows the scarcity of water. For the photographer it’s not our looks, but our actions that make our portraits. 

Especially for this exposition Koos Buster created disposable bottles. The artist marvels at the amount of plastic bottles containing water from Spa in a country where drinking water from the tap is among the best in the world.

Mazen Al Ashkar concentrates on the healing power of water. In times of sickness, his grandmother used to recite the words of a blessing over a glass of water, convinced consuming it would relieve the pain. 

Perfume artist Frank Bloem created the smell of the North Sea asking the question: ‘What else do you smell at the North Sea, besides weed, crabs and jellyfish?’ 

In The Flood Tina Farifteh aims to dissect the use of water as a metaphor, to understand and visualize the dominant discourse on migration and question the current framing of refugees as a natural disaster. 

The Water School, initiated by studio Makking & Bey, shows future-oriented possibilities for a better approach to water. 

In the sound installation of Elise ‘t Hart you will hear sounds from her archive that have to do with flowing, clattering, dripping, flushing and gurgling water. They are the usual sounds of daily domestic life that makes us realize that water is all-encompassing.

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Manifesto for the living in a time of extinction

Manifesto for the living in a time of extinction

This programme is part of the overall programme Manifesto for the living in a time of extinction. This is an eight-day programme about climate change in a greenhouse on the roof of a city building. In relation to this manifesto, art will not only be made about the climate crisis, but we will also ask ourselves how we might, in an inclusive manner, take action. 

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